Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Some hot, some wet, 
some storms, and some nice...

Saturday, 9 July, 9:50 AM CDT (0950) The Low moving into the Plains will produce heavy rain and perhaps severe thunderstorms. This system will produce strong precipitation in the Great Lakes region by tonight. The Front in the South remains in place, providing a corridor for moist Gulf air to bring showers and thunderstorms to the Southeast until Monday at least. The Southwest has been receiving Gulf of California moisture to bring its rain. Heat Statements, both Advisories and Watches, have been posted in eight Mid-Western and Southern States.

Air Quality Alerts have been issued in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and North Carolina. Flooding is on the decrease in the Mid-west. The Pacific Northwest and the Mid-Atlantic have no Hazardous Statements at this time.

For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast
With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week.
Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


Another Hot and Wet Day
For Much of the Country...

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Friday, 8 July 10:10 AM EDT


The South and near-South will continue to have extremely hot temperatures, with 100’s as far North as Kansas. Monsoonal moisture will bring thunderstorms to the Great Basin while a front from the Southwest to the Mid-Atlantic will couple with a Gulf Low to bring heavy rains to much of the East today and tonight. The greatest risks (slight, at this time) for severe weather are the Upper Plains and the Mid-Atlantic. Air Quality remains an issue in Tulsa, New Jersey, and North Carolina.

For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


Muggy
, for now...

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Thursday, 7 July 9:50 PM EDT

A ridge across the South will bring extremely warm temperatures to that area into the weekend. A strong system entering into the Pacific Northwest will bring precipitation into the Mountains, and then the Great Plains. A trough over the East will provide a track for a series of Lows to progress, bringing rain and storms for the next few days. Severe storms are possible in the Southwest.
Air Quality Alerts remain posted in the Baltimore/Philadelphia corridor, Delaware and North Carolina.

Special Report from the Pacific Northwest: Lead Forecaster Mark Ingalls of Kennewick, WA posted this update and video on a rare and little-known weather phenomenon that is unique to the Desert Southwest, known as a "haboob." No really, it is an actual anomaly that occurs once or twice a year but is never caught on camera, until now. Details at Mark's website: mizweather.blogspot.com.


For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason




Continued Heat...Continued Storms...Continued

Dust?

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Wednesday, 6 July 10:50 AM EDT




A ridge over the Southwest and Lower Plains will continue to bring high temperatures and storms from the Desert to the Texas/Oklahoma region.. This energy will move eastward into the Great Plains over the next day or so. Another front will produce showers and thunderstorms across the Southeast into the Mid-Atlantic. A third system, stretching from the Great Lakes up into Canada might produce Severe Storm into New England. Air Quality is an issue in several Western urban areas, as well as along the I-95 Metroplex from Baltimore to NYC. Conditions that produced the Dust Storm in Arizona yesterday may…may…be repeated tomorrow.
NWS- Mid-West Flood Update: Since July 2, several more levees have been overtopped and/or breached along the Missouri River. At this time, all non-federal levees upstream of Kansas City in the Kansas City District Corps of Engineers area of responsibility have been overtopped and/or breached. Missouri River runoff above Sioux City, IA for June 2011 set a record of 13.8 million acre feet. This is the highest monthly runoff ever for the period 1898 to 2011. The runoff above Sioux City for May and June 2011 combined is 24.3 million acre feet. This is nearly equal to the average yearly runoff for the entire Missouri River.
For More Details...see STORMCAST

Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason






Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam...

(OK...a little later than that ...)

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Tuesday, 5 July 9:20 AM EDT



On this Day after our 235th Birthday, the heat continues across the Southern U.S. as a broad Ridge is covering the area. The Southwest will see showers from West Coast moisture. A series of Fronts will bring precipitation to the Plains, the Mid-West and finally, the Northeast. The Upper Plains show the greatest risk of Severe Weather, from Wyoming to Iowa. North Dakota had two tornadoes yesterday. The Mid-Atlantic and several Southern urban areas have Air Quality Alerts posted. The Flooding continues in the Mid-West, with 6 States, and over 180 Counties having Disaster Declarations currently posted.

For More Details...see STORMCAST

Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep...

Monday, 3 July 10:20 AM EDT


The Heat will continue from the Southwest to the Southeast, with numerous area hitting triple-digits. Precipitation is forecast for much of the Country. Flash Flooding is possible in the Mississippi/Ohio River regions and Upper mid-West. Air Quality Alerts have been posted in locations in the East.
Tonight, there is a high probability for Red Glare from Rockets, care should be taken for possible Bombs Bursting in Air during Twilight’s Last Gleaming. Dawn’s Early Light should reveal Broad Stripes and Bright Stars still Waving over the Land of The Free and the Home of The Brave.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




A Little Cooler...a Little Drier...
so far...

Sunday, 3 July 11:20 AM EDT


Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


A Ridge across the U.S. from California to the Southeast will bring hot and humid conditions to the South and Mid-Mississippi. Behind this Ridge, storms will pop up along the Canadian border. A front from the Plains to the Ohio Valley and into the Northeast will produce showers and storms through the Holiday weekend.
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos has now burned 121,248 acres and is 11% contained. The fireline is holding near the communities of Vallecitos de Los Indios and Sierra Los Pinos. Fire crews and equipment remain in this area to provide structure protection. Structure protection is also in place in other areas as needed. All firefighting crews receive a daily briefing on sensitive historical and cultural sites within the fire area. Archeologists have been assigned to work with crews to minimize damage to sensitive areas.
Air Quality Alerts are posted across the Mid-Atlantic and the South.

For More Details...see STORMCAST



The Dogs Days of...July?

22 of the Lower 48 States have Heat Advisories, Air Quality Statements...or both...

Saturday, 2 July 9:45 AM EDT


Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


A Ridge from the Pacific to the Gulf States will be instrumental in bringing 90+ to 100+ degree temperatures to those areas. A slow Frontal boundary in the North will set off showers and thunderstorms across the Plains and Mississippi Valley. This system will reach the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast by tomorrow evening.
Air Quality Alerts are up in the Mid-Atlantic and across the South.
Severe storms may occur East of the Rockies, and from the Mid-West across the Great Lakes. Iowa continues to prepare for the flooding that affected Minot, ND
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos has now burned 103,993 acres making it the largest fire in New Mexico history. Containment is estimated at five percent. Although fire lines in the Los Alamos area are currently holding, these lines are not fully contained. Firefighting activities focus on protecting communities, watersheds, and other important features including numerous communication sites and the New Mexico natural gas pipeline.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




Hotter than..
a) a sidewalk in Texas
b) a sandy beach at mid-day
c) an asphalt road
d) the coals on your grill
e) a hound dog lazing on a Nebraska porch
f) all of this and more...

Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out

Friday, 1 July 11:00 AM EDT


July starts off where June left off: with an oppressive heat forecast throughout the Mid-West, and Southwest. Desert temps could reach 120°F. A ridge from New Mexico to the Ohio Valley will bring triple-digit temperatures and set off thunderstorms throughout the Southland. A second, stalled Front will produce storms across Florida. The remnants of Arlene may bring Coastal Flooding, Rip Tides, and heavy rain to Southern Texas.
NWS Wildfire Report- There are no new critical areas for wildfires on Friday, however the Las Conchas fire continues to burn. Firefighters were confident Thursday they had stopped the advance of the wildfire that headed toward the Los Alamos nuclear lab. This fire started on private land three miles south of Los Alamos. Residences, power lines, natural gas lines, Bandelier National Monument and the Los Alamos National Laboratory are threatened. Evacuations are in effect.
The water that flooded Minot, ND is on its way to Iowa, where flood preparations are continuing. Many areas in the Southeast have Air Quality Alerts posted.
For More Details...see STORMCAST



Tropical Temps
in...Wisconsin????

Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out

Thursday, 30 June 10:20 AM EDT

A Front from North Dakota to Arizona will slowly move across the Rockies and bring showers and thunderstorms there today, and then bring precipitation to the Upper Plains and Mississippi Valley by tomorrow morning. Another Front will produce storms across the Gulf Coast and Florida until tomorrow evening. The Northeast will get some wrap-around rain from a Low in Canada overnight. Some of the storms in the High Plains could be severe.
Heat Statements are up in 12 States, with much of the Upper Mid-west in the grips of a stifling hot air mass.
There is a possibility TS Arlene, now having made landfall in Mexico, could bring some welcome rain to Southern Texas.
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico has burned approximately 80,000 acres. The fire is 3% contained. The city of Los Alamos is under a mandatory evacuation. Los Alamos National Laboratory remains closed. The Wallow Fire in southeast Arizona has burned over 538,049 acres and is 93% contained. The Monument Fire along the International Border in southeast Arizona has burned 30,526 acres and is 92% contained. The Honey Prairie Fire in Georgia has burned 283,698 acres and is is 70% contained. The critical fire conditions for today exist across southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northern New Mexico, southwestern Colorado, western Kansas, and the panhandle areas of Oklahoma and Texas.
Flooding remains a serious concern in North Dakota, and much of the Missouri River Floodplain.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




'A' is for Arlene...


Just in:
Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


Wednesday, 29 June 10:40 AM EDT


As you know, Atlantic Hurricane Season begins June 1st. Mother Nature waited until almost the end of the month to give us our first named storm. Tropical Storm Arlene poses no threat to the U.S. The other Good News is that she might just toss some much-needed rain onto our drought-stricken Southwest.
Elsewhere, two Fronts will bring precipitation to the West, and across the country from the Upper Plains down through the Mississippi Valley, the South, and up the East Coast into New England.
Red Flag Warnings are up in five States, and Heat Statements have been issued in six more.
NWS Fire Statement: The Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico has burned over 60,000 acres and is only 3% contained. Twelve residences have been destroyed. The city of Los Alamos is under a mandatory evacuation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory remains closed. Significant fires are ongoing across Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Conditions are extremely critical for fires across a portion of southern Nevada. Critical fire conditions across the rest of southern and eastern Nevada, northern Arizona, southern Utah, far western Colorado, northwest New Mexico, and southeast California also exist.

For More Details...see STORMCAST

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