Sunday, August 28, 2011

Last Week: Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado
This Week: Sunshine, blue sky, Tylenol



Hurricane/Tropical Storm Irene as she made a third landfall in New York City

8:00 AM EDT 8/29/11: On this sixth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's landfall in New Orleans, tens of millions are still dealing with major to catastrophic impacts from the first Hurricane to strike the U.S. since Ike along the Texas coast in 2008. 


It goes without saying Irene clocked the Carolinas and Mid-Atlantic, before nailing the Northeast a historic blast of tropical storm- to hurricane-force winds and torrential rain. Eight+ inch rainfalls have been reported by CoCoRaHS members in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York. New England won't be reporting until Monday AM, and many stations in North Carolina have not yet reported storm totals for reasons most certainly related to Irene. Catastrophic flooding continues in Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, portions of Upstate New York and across Vermont/New Hampshire. 


Check your local National Weather Service forecast offices for the latest flood statements and heed evacuation orders from local emergency management. 


TEAM STATUS: Our student forecast teams are continuing to operate despite power outages due to multi-state coverage from different locations. Their latest forecasts are easily accessible via our Facebook pages. 


TROPICAL UPDATES: The multi-state Tropical Team continues on the lookout for what the Atlantic may churn up next. Unfortunately, they found something... and details are available via facebook at present in our Tropical Zone. 


INTERESTED IN JOINING? Irene was a harsh reminder that summer can be fun but can also turn dangerous when all the right factors come together. Our team was created to provide students and weather enthusiasts the opportunity to marshal their knowledge, training and life experience together into a collaborative effort. We do this to keep our readers well-informed of threats to life and property, in support of the mission of the National Weather Service. If you are interested in submitting an application, review the details in this link(Advisors Foot and Lear)

9 comments:

Andy, Southern York County, PA said...

<span>It's still wise to stay inside for a couple of hours.  This tree just fell 5 minutes ago right outside my home.  The fire dept vehicle you see just happened to be driving down the road 2 minutes after it fell.  Very dangerous situation since the line can snap any second.  That tree is about 40 feet tall.  I was standing out there 15 minutes before it happened </span> =-O =-O =-O

ravensbbr said...

some damage out there, obviously tragic with any loss of life, but I still have to give props to the Brits for putting this in some perspective...

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/tobyharnden/100102355/perfect-storm-of-hype-politicians-the-media-and-the-hurricane-irene-apocalypse-that-never-was/

Andy, Southern York County, PA said...

I agree that the media tends to overhype in this country way too often.  We don't need live shots from the boardwalk every ten minutes.  One day  future there will be a group of reporters killed by storm surge, lightening, or a tornado. 

The overhype is silly.  On the other hand you should never take a Hurricane lightley,  especially on the coast. Hurricanes cause most of their damage in places like Ocean City not because of their winds or rains, but the storm surge.  The track of this storm produced little to no surge and was in the end a low impact event.  If the track had changed that could have been another story.  Major coastal storms like this need to be taken seriously, because if they don't behave as expected then major problems can happen.  Isabelle was not much worse that this storm, but its track created a nightmare in the metro region due to tidal surge.   

If the silly hype keeps fools out of the way in case the worst impact happens, then I won't complain too much.  I remember too many winter storms in the recent past that were downplayed to the extreme, and that downplay created major havoc in people's lives.

ravensbbr said...

Good points, Andy. For sure, take the rain-to-snow event of last winter as Exhibit A of what you're talking about. It's just a shame there isn't more common sense out there, and I don't mean, "eat your peas, do what you're told" by that, but more, "Hey, the surf is twice as tall as my house and I don't swim that well, huh, maybe I shouldn't go out today." Or: "maybe driving my 4wheeler around @ 2AM could lead to bad things tonight"

Gotta love the clip at the end of it. Sums it all up

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qRJeIhW89s

Amy said...

I was stunned to see a woman from NJ today on the news going on and on about how bad it was to lose electricity and how unprepared they were.  She said she didn't know it was going to be this bad???? How did she miss the news hype?

I say better to be overprepared than under prepared.  Many people in NY and NJ didn't bother to even buy drinking water and are freaked out now that all the flooding has taken place.

ravensbbr said...

Prepared: absolutely. Panicked by ignorant news media and overbearing officials: not so good.

BioPat said...

I couldn't agree more with your point of view.  Unfortunately, media hype is a serious problem regardless of the event.  In the US we have many freedoms including speech, but our culture has this tremendous need to take everything to the maximum extreme from weather to finances.  We dodged a major bullet this past weekend, and as an Ocean City home owner, I am most grateful.  Our only casuality was my new scooter suffered a ripped seat cover from a large limb falling on it.

BioPat said...

And so, what about Katia??

ravensbbr said...

Too early to panic, never too soon to take reasonable precautions...

http://www.wunderground.com/tropical/tracking/at201112_5day.html