Saturday, August 13, 2011

Welcoming New Affiliates and Forecasters

7:15 PM EDT 8/13/2011: While portions of the Mid-Atlantic are either getting soaked or smoked, the tropics are churning up a few gray hairs for our Tropical Team. We are also noticing a growing risk of severe weather in the East and other parts of the country. As part of our mission for students to collaborate on engaging the public with locally relevant forecasts, the team itself also reaches out to work with others around the nation showing quality work. As part of an on-going  rollout of 10 new forecast zones and their forecasters, we are equally excited to introduce four new Affiliate Forecasters from around the United States. You will begin seeing their reports linked in our lead stories when weather is breaking in their regions.

Affiliate Forecaster Josh Owens is a 2010 graduate of the NOAA-funded Weather Camp program headquartered at Howard University. Our team first met Josh in summer 2010 and we've been collaborating with him ever since. He is a well-spoken, dedicated forecaster and the team is pleased to publicly announce our partnership with him and his website, Maryland Weather Center. Our Mid-Atlantic readers will also begin seeing more of Josh's reports as a Regional Forecaster in the Mid-Atlantic Severe Weather and Winter Stormcast pages.


Affiliate Forecaster Ben Redmon of  Michigan Weather Watchers has had a life long passion for weather ever since a tornado tore over his house when he was  just 7 years. A resident of central Michigan, he has forecasted in wild weather most months of the year.  Between severe storms, crippling  snow, heat waves and spring downpours, Ben has seen it all.  Readers this summer have seen several of Ben's reports, which are posted at times in our "Central" tab above.  Readers in the Upper Great Lakes region will be seeing Ben's reports in a Winter Stormcast page for that region. 

In the plains of Kansas, weather is just as unique and challenging for a forecaster as it is in the Mid-Atlantic or Pacific Northwest. To expand our perspectives on how weather impacts life in the Central Plains,  we are happy to introduce Affiliate Forecaster Brooks of Cirrus Weather. Brooks, who resides in central Kansas, has a wide range of interests in addition to serving and interacting with his readers. Among his career interests are the aviation aspects of weather and forecasting. When severe weather breaks this fall, winter and next spring, expect to see boots-on-the-ground reports from Brooks in a place where severe thunderstorms are considered "normal." 

Affiliate Forecaster Wesley of Convective Weather forecasts for large portion of the South Central states and has a clear passion for sharing knowledge  about weather to inspire them to learn more about how the atmosphere impacts their area. Wesley enjoys forecasting to people "who want to know more about the weather than what the typical 5-day forecast has to offer" as he wrote in his Affiliate application. We are looking forward to developing a strong collaboration with Wesley and the Convective Weather team to help cross-promote our sites and shared goals, especially when severe weather lights up across his region. 

How does the Affiliate program work? 

It's simpler than you might think. This page outlines the process of how other forecasters across the country and around the world can keep operating their own personal site, but have a professional, collaborative Affiliation with our team. During major events, the Affiliate program has shown demonstrated success in reaching a larger audience for both our team and our Affiliates... so we share the stage together, and it is a lot of fun!
  

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