Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Some hot, some wet, 
some storms, and some nice...

Saturday, 9 July, 9:50 AM CDT (0950) The Low moving into the Plains will produce heavy rain and perhaps severe thunderstorms. This system will produce strong precipitation in the Great Lakes region by tonight. The Front in the South remains in place, providing a corridor for moist Gulf air to bring showers and thunderstorms to the Southeast until Monday at least. The Southwest has been receiving Gulf of California moisture to bring its rain. Heat Statements, both Advisories and Watches, have been posted in eight Mid-Western and Southern States.

Air Quality Alerts have been issued in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and North Carolina. Flooding is on the decrease in the Mid-west. The Pacific Northwest and the Mid-Atlantic have no Hazardous Statements at this time.

For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast
With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week.
Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


Another Hot and Wet Day
For Much of the Country...

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Friday, 8 July 10:10 AM EDT


The South and near-South will continue to have extremely hot temperatures, with 100’s as far North as Kansas. Monsoonal moisture will bring thunderstorms to the Great Basin while a front from the Southwest to the Mid-Atlantic will couple with a Gulf Low to bring heavy rains to much of the East today and tonight. The greatest risks (slight, at this time) for severe weather are the Upper Plains and the Mid-Atlantic. Air Quality remains an issue in Tulsa, New Jersey, and North Carolina.

For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


Muggy
, for now...

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Thursday, 7 July 9:50 PM EDT

A ridge across the South will bring extremely warm temperatures to that area into the weekend. A strong system entering into the Pacific Northwest will bring precipitation into the Mountains, and then the Great Plains. A trough over the East will provide a track for a series of Lows to progress, bringing rain and storms for the next few days. Severe storms are possible in the Southwest.
Air Quality Alerts remain posted in the Baltimore/Philadelphia corridor, Delaware and North Carolina.

Special Report from the Pacific Northwest: Lead Forecaster Mark Ingalls of Kennewick, WA posted this update and video on a rare and little-known weather phenomenon that is unique to the Desert Southwest, known as a "haboob." No really, it is an actual anomaly that occurs once or twice a year but is never caught on camera, until now. Details at Mark's website: mizweather.blogspot.com.


For More Details...see STORMCAST


Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason




Continued Heat...Continued Storms...Continued

Dust?

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Wednesday, 6 July 10:50 AM EDT




A ridge over the Southwest and Lower Plains will continue to bring high temperatures and storms from the Desert to the Texas/Oklahoma region.. This energy will move eastward into the Great Plains over the next day or so. Another front will produce showers and thunderstorms across the Southeast into the Mid-Atlantic. A third system, stretching from the Great Lakes up into Canada might produce Severe Storm into New England. Air Quality is an issue in several Western urban areas, as well as along the I-95 Metroplex from Baltimore to NYC. Conditions that produced the Dust Storm in Arizona yesterday may…may…be repeated tomorrow.
NWS- Mid-West Flood Update: Since July 2, several more levees have been overtopped and/or breached along the Missouri River. At this time, all non-federal levees upstream of Kansas City in the Kansas City District Corps of Engineers area of responsibility have been overtopped and/or breached. Missouri River runoff above Sioux City, IA for June 2011 set a record of 13.8 million acre feet. This is the highest monthly runoff ever for the period 1898 to 2011. The runoff above Sioux City for May and June 2011 combined is 24.3 million acre feet. This is nearly equal to the average yearly runoff for the entire Missouri River.
For More Details...see STORMCAST

Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason






Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam...

(OK...a little later than that ...)

Weather University- Summer Session
New Lesson

Tuesday, 5 July 9:20 AM EDT



On this Day after our 235th Birthday, the heat continues across the Southern U.S. as a broad Ridge is covering the area. The Southwest will see showers from West Coast moisture. A series of Fronts will bring precipitation to the Plains, the Mid-West and finally, the Northeast. The Upper Plains show the greatest risk of Severe Weather, from Wyoming to Iowa. North Dakota had two tornadoes yesterday. The Mid-Atlantic and several Southern urban areas have Air Quality Alerts posted. The Flooding continues in the Mid-West, with 6 States, and over 180 Counties having Disaster Declarations currently posted.

For More Details...see STORMCAST

Long-Range Forecast

With a mid level ridge of high pressure holding strong across the Southern U.S., the Southeast and Plains should have above average temperatures for at least the next 7-10 days. Based on a couple long range models and guidance from NOAA’s HPC, a cold front should sweep through the Eastern U.S. in the early to middle portion of next week. Overall, the East Coast should have normal to slightly above temperatures and near normal precipitation through the middle of next week. Above average temperatures are likely during this time period for the Plains and portions of the West as the strong ridge of high pressure remains firmly in place.
Forecaster Jason


On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep...

Monday, 3 July 10:20 AM EDT


The Heat will continue from the Southwest to the Southeast, with numerous area hitting triple-digits. Precipitation is forecast for much of the Country. Flash Flooding is possible in the Mississippi/Ohio River regions and Upper mid-West. Air Quality Alerts have been posted in locations in the East.
Tonight, there is a high probability for Red Glare from Rockets, care should be taken for possible Bombs Bursting in Air during Twilight’s Last Gleaming. Dawn’s Early Light should reveal Broad Stripes and Bright Stars still Waving over the Land of The Free and the Home of The Brave.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




A Little Cooler...a Little Drier...
so far...

Sunday, 3 July 11:20 AM EDT


Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


A Ridge across the U.S. from California to the Southeast will bring hot and humid conditions to the South and Mid-Mississippi. Behind this Ridge, storms will pop up along the Canadian border. A front from the Plains to the Ohio Valley and into the Northeast will produce showers and storms through the Holiday weekend.
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos has now burned 121,248 acres and is 11% contained. The fireline is holding near the communities of Vallecitos de Los Indios and Sierra Los Pinos. Fire crews and equipment remain in this area to provide structure protection. Structure protection is also in place in other areas as needed. All firefighting crews receive a daily briefing on sensitive historical and cultural sites within the fire area. Archeologists have been assigned to work with crews to minimize damage to sensitive areas.
Air Quality Alerts are posted across the Mid-Atlantic and the South.

For More Details...see STORMCAST



The Dogs Days of...July?

22 of the Lower 48 States have Heat Advisories, Air Quality Statements...or both...

Saturday, 2 July 9:45 AM EDT


Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


A Ridge from the Pacific to the Gulf States will be instrumental in bringing 90+ to 100+ degree temperatures to those areas. A slow Frontal boundary in the North will set off showers and thunderstorms across the Plains and Mississippi Valley. This system will reach the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast by tomorrow evening.
Air Quality Alerts are up in the Mid-Atlantic and across the South.
Severe storms may occur East of the Rockies, and from the Mid-West across the Great Lakes. Iowa continues to prepare for the flooding that affected Minot, ND
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos has now burned 103,993 acres making it the largest fire in New Mexico history. Containment is estimated at five percent. Although fire lines in the Los Alamos area are currently holding, these lines are not fully contained. Firefighting activities focus on protecting communities, watersheds, and other important features including numerous communication sites and the New Mexico natural gas pipeline.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




Hotter than..
a) a sidewalk in Texas
b) a sandy beach at mid-day
c) an asphalt road
d) the coals on your grill
e) a hound dog lazing on a Nebraska porch
f) all of this and more...

Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out

Friday, 1 July 11:00 AM EDT


July starts off where June left off: with an oppressive heat forecast throughout the Mid-West, and Southwest. Desert temps could reach 120°F. A ridge from New Mexico to the Ohio Valley will bring triple-digit temperatures and set off thunderstorms throughout the Southland. A second, stalled Front will produce storms across Florida. The remnants of Arlene may bring Coastal Flooding, Rip Tides, and heavy rain to Southern Texas.
NWS Wildfire Report- There are no new critical areas for wildfires on Friday, however the Las Conchas fire continues to burn. Firefighters were confident Thursday they had stopped the advance of the wildfire that headed toward the Los Alamos nuclear lab. This fire started on private land three miles south of Los Alamos. Residences, power lines, natural gas lines, Bandelier National Monument and the Los Alamos National Laboratory are threatened. Evacuations are in effect.
The water that flooded Minot, ND is on its way to Iowa, where flood preparations are continuing. Many areas in the Southeast have Air Quality Alerts posted.
For More Details...see STORMCAST



Tropical Temps
in...Wisconsin????

Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out

Thursday, 30 June 10:20 AM EDT

A Front from North Dakota to Arizona will slowly move across the Rockies and bring showers and thunderstorms there today, and then bring precipitation to the Upper Plains and Mississippi Valley by tomorrow morning. Another Front will produce storms across the Gulf Coast and Florida until tomorrow evening. The Northeast will get some wrap-around rain from a Low in Canada overnight. Some of the storms in the High Plains could be severe.
Heat Statements are up in 12 States, with much of the Upper Mid-west in the grips of a stifling hot air mass.
There is a possibility TS Arlene, now having made landfall in Mexico, could bring some welcome rain to Southern Texas.
NWS Wildfire Update: The Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico has burned approximately 80,000 acres. The fire is 3% contained. The city of Los Alamos is under a mandatory evacuation. Los Alamos National Laboratory remains closed. The Wallow Fire in southeast Arizona has burned over 538,049 acres and is 93% contained. The Monument Fire along the International Border in southeast Arizona has burned 30,526 acres and is 92% contained. The Honey Prairie Fire in Georgia has burned 283,698 acres and is is 70% contained. The critical fire conditions for today exist across southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northern New Mexico, southwestern Colorado, western Kansas, and the panhandle areas of Oklahoma and Texas.
Flooding remains a serious concern in North Dakota, and much of the Missouri River Floodplain.

For More Details...see STORMCAST




'A' is for Arlene...


Just in:
Foot's Forecast Student Forecasters Guide Baltimore County, Maryland through a Hurricane Simulation...check it out


Wednesday, 29 June 10:40 AM EDT


As you know, Atlantic Hurricane Season begins June 1st. Mother Nature waited until almost the end of the month to give us our first named storm. Tropical Storm Arlene poses no threat to the U.S. The other Good News is that she might just toss some much-needed rain onto our drought-stricken Southwest.
Elsewhere, two Fronts will bring precipitation to the West, and across the country from the Upper Plains down through the Mississippi Valley, the South, and up the East Coast into New England.
Red Flag Warnings are up in five States, and Heat Statements have been issued in six more.
NWS Fire Statement: The Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico has burned over 60,000 acres and is only 3% contained. Twelve residences have been destroyed. The city of Los Alamos is under a mandatory evacuation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory remains closed. Significant fires are ongoing across Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Conditions are extremely critical for fires across a portion of southern Nevada. Critical fire conditions across the rest of southern and eastern Nevada, northern Arizona, southern Utah, far western Colorado, northwest New Mexico, and southeast California also exist.

For More Details...see STORMCAST

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Too dry in the wrong places

8:05 AM EDT Tuesday 6/28/2011 As wildfires threaten the Los Alamos, New Mexico Nuclear Laboratory and surrounding communities, residents in the High Plains are just starting the long slog of recovery as flood waters recede in Minot and continue plaguing a nuclear power plant in Fort Calhoun in eastern Nebraska, as reported by the Washington Post. Long range projections by the NOAA Climate Prediction Centerindicate that little relief awaits in the 8-to-14 day period ahead. Precipitation where it would be needed may remain at or below normal, while temperatures where heat is at a surplus should continue above normal.

As reported by Forecaster Mike Natoli this morning's Central Maryland update, a lack of rain in the wrong places may only be improved by isolated thunderstorms in the Mid-Atlantic. Otherwise, generally dry and low chance of rain will be the trend for much of the East heading into the July 4 weekend (Forecasters Foot and Mike N.)

For More Details...see STORMCAST

REPORT FROM THE TROPICAL TEAM: As of 8:50 PM EDT 6/27/11, Low pressure over the Bay of Campeche has shown some iincrease in organization over the past day. The National Hurricane Center has indicated this area of interest at a 50% chance of developing over next couple days. Regardless of further development, the system should track northwestward into southern Mexico by Thursday. Our team will closely monitor this system and NHC updates, with reports posted in our Tropical Zone on facebook. (Forecaster Jason M. - Calvert County, MD)

Saturday, June 25, 2011

10:55 AM EDT Monday 6/27/2011 A Front, extending from Canada, through the Mississippi Valley to the Southwest will move towards the East by tomorrow. This should touch off showers and thunderstorms ahead of it. At the same time, a Low over the Mid-Atlantic may bring showers to that area and the Southeast. A Pacific Low will bring precipitation to the PNW tomorrow. There are possible Severe Thunderstorms over Northern Texas into the panhandle of Oklahoma and Colorado. The Mid-Mississippi Valley, the Ohio Valley, and the Great Lakes Region may also see strong storms. Fires still burn in the Southwest and North Carolina, there are Heat Statements for Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Arizona. Flooding continues in the North and the Mid-West.

The East & Pacific Northwest: Calm today.

Northern Plains & Southwest: Not so.

See NOAA National Hazards Map in the left sidebar for details

6:05 PM EDT Sunday 6/26/2011 The passage of a Cold Front from the Upper Plains will bring possible showers and thunderstorms to the Mid-West and Great Lakes over the next 48 hours. Another boundary will produce precipitation, perhaps severe, to the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys. A strong system will come off of the Pacific to affect the Northwest by Monday evening. Red Flag Warnings are posted in eight States, and Heat, or Excessive Heat, Statements, are posted in five.

While the predictions for the Minot Flooding have been lowered, the area will still see a record level broken by six feet or more.

For More Details...see STORMCAST


Wednesday, June 22, 2011

UPDATE ON FACEBOOK FORECAST ZONES
Lead Forecaster Patrick Ritsko is now posting in the South Florida Zone covering metro Miami to the Keys. Forecaster Nikki Byers leads our Central Virginia Zone and on July 23, Forecaster Greg Jackson returns from sabbatical to launch the Three Rivers Zone for the Pittsburgh metro region.


The sky may be dry, but...


8:30 AM EDT Friday 6/24/2011
Despite relative calm in the weather going into this weekend, major flooding threatens tens of thousands of people in the Missouri Basin of the upper Great Plains. This image from the NWS River Forecast Center for the Missouri Basin shows over a dozen locations from South Dakota to Kansas facing moderate to major flooding over the next 24 hours. The NWS is reporting that "the Missouri River continues to rise, and levee breaches are a major concern in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, and Nebraska. Interstate 29 has been shut down in several locations in Iowa and Missouri. Every bridge crossing from St. Joseph, Mo., to Omaha, Neb., has been closed."

LEVEE FAILURE KETV-7 in Omaha, Nebraska reported a levee failure in Brownville, Neb forcing evacuations of hundreds of residents along I-29. Flood Warnings remain in effect into the weekend across a large portion of the Midwest and Upper Great Plains, from St. Louis, MO to Bismarck, ND as indicated by bright green on the NWS Advisory Map.


RED FLAG WARNINGS / SEVERE WEATHER
Persistent dry and windy conditions in the Southern Plain and Southwest, exacerbated by a long-term drought situation, have led to resurgence in Red Flag Warnings for northern Texas, western Oklahoma, the Four Corners area and northern Arizona. Residents in these areas are urged to avoid outdoor burning of any kind due to high risk of wildfire. In the Mid-South and Northeast, a slight risk of severe weather is denoted for today by the Storm Prediction Center, but otherwise a significant outbreak of thunderstorms or tornadoes is not expected for the next several days.

FIRST REPORT FROM WEATHER CAMP Storm Chaser Vince Webb, operator of the Mississippi Storm Chasing website and a Severe Weather Tracker in our Mississippi Severe page on the FF Southeast Team, filed this special video report from the Jackson State University NCAS Weather Camp in Jackson, Mississippi. A shout out from the entire Foot's Forecast team to all the weather campers of the first 2011 camp, we look forward to learning of the cool knowledge you all have gained in your eye-opening week at camp!





For parents and prospective 2012 student applicants in grades 6-11, get an inside look in our exclusive section developed for the NOAA-funded Weather Camp program. Foot's Forecast is a direct partner with the Howard University-based program in Washington DC and the 12-site network. You can also get a quick photo mosaic of the 2010 camp on the Howard NCAS facebook page. Parents, mark your calendars for the 2012 application, expected for release sometime later this year.


Welcoming Summer
...and new opportunities for you


INTRODUCING NEW FORECASTERS The Eastern U.S. Team of Foot's Forecast is stoked to introduce three new forecasters since June 1:

Jeremy Michael, a senior in Meteorology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, has joined as an Associate Forecaster in the FF Potomac Ridge & Valley Zone of western MD, West Virginia and Northern Virginia.

Andy Smith, a weather enthusiast, storm chaser, and graduate of Gloucester High School in southeast Virginia, is our newest Associate Forecaster in the FF Virginia Tidewater Zone including the southern Chesapeake Bay region.

Samantha Hilbert, a senior at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, will be coming on board in as a Special Reports Forecast in FF Mid-Atlantic Severe Weather on facebook.

Give it up for these innovative new members! If you have been waiting for the right time to get your application rolling, do it now while the weather is cutting us a break. Stop on over to our team center or look over the application.


Calm in some places, but not everywhere

3:30 PM Wednesday 6/22/2011 | The first full day following arrival of the Summer Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere is mostly calm across North America as most students and families are welcoming a long-awaited start to the vacation season. This traditionally "sun-splashed" week of late sunsets and early sunrises does not come without challenges. Consider these high impact problems affecting some regions in a less-than-calm day, for them:

1) The tireless workers of the Texas Forest Service, among many other public and fire safety crews have made progress in containing a recent spate of wildfires in Texas. However, Excessive Heat Warnings are posted for the far desert southwest, as temperatures near 115 with even higher heat indices are being reported in the Yuma Valley and metro Phoenix.

2) On-going river valley flooding is prevalent in the Upper Mississippi Valley as evidenced by the bright green Flood Warnings as shown on the NWS Advisory Map, including eastern South Dakota and the Omaha Valley.

3) Severe Thunderstorm Watches are posted for the Eastern Great Lakes and in the Southeast, as daytime heating and upper level instability may fuel severe storms this evening.

4) Other than an open Tropical Wave approaching the Bahamas just north of Hispanola, the Atlantic Basin and Eastern Pacific are generally quiet, but tropical breeding grounds in the eastern Caribbean and south-central Atlantic remain up to 2 degrees F above normal.
Yes, Virginia...there is good news.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 As the U.S. Team of Foot's Forecast welcomes summer, we have a plethora of exciting developments and special features to share with you, our readers.  We will be outlining a fresh new story spotlighting our partnership with the NOAA-funded Weather Camp program, showcase new forecasters and newly relaunched forecast zones in multiple areas of the country. For those interested in exploring new partnerships, forecasting services or products, we have a developing special offier for those looking to build a client relationship with our team. (Lead Advisor Mr. Foot, Collaborators Aaron Salter, Nikki Byers, Matt Bolton and Diandre Williams). Photo: Early June 2011 gathering of members from the Mid-Atlantic Team at Forecaster Greg Jackson's graduation party.

SPOTLIGHT ON WEATHER CAMP
This first week of the 2011 summer is accompanied by the most bangin' event in all of Weatherdom: The NOAA-funded Weather Camp program. Foot's Forecast has been a direct collaborator with this innovative and expanding 11-site future scientist education program led by Howard University's NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science in Washington, DC. Seven forecasters or affiliates on our team today were 2010 Weather Camp graduates. This summer, several of our members will continue innovating the future of forecasting at several Weather Camps in the U.S. We hope all Weather Camp students will consider the life-changing opportunities which can be gained from becoming a part of our multi-state team that is changing the way we view weather forecasting in America today...because it's run by students. 

Storm Chaser/Forecaster Vince Webb, shown below with Mr. Foot during a meeting in Colorado, will make several appearances at the Jackson State University Weather Camp in progress this week. Vince has earned his claim to fame after a rip-roaring time this Spring chasing-- and several times-- being chased by tornadoes in the historic southeast outbreaks. Check out Vince's amazing page of tornado videos and incredible stories:

Among the participants at the 2011 Howard Camp will be Matt Bolton, the Lead Forecaster for FF Central Florida who was a Summer 2010 graduate of the Jackson Camp and a colleague of Vince Webb. Matt has operated the Central Florida Zone since October 2010, is a central members of the Foot's Forecast Web Team and serves on the multi-state Tropical Zone in facebook and our main site.

Aaron Salter, Director of U.S. Team Operations for Foot's Forecast, and a senior at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, will be a student counselor at the July 10-23 NCAS Howard University Camp in WashingtonAaron met Vince at the Howard Camp last summer and collaborates with a number of the 2010 students. He brings a depth of experience in Environmental Studies, Weather Forecasting, Public Speaking, is an avid surfer, and also oversees applications for prospective members of the team.  For questions on joining the team, feel welcome to "Ask Aaron" anytime: aaron.salter@footsforecast.org  or review the application materials at our Team Center. 

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Welcome to Summer!


Wednesday, 6/22/2011, 10:30 AM EDT




For more...see STORMCAST



The Summer Solstice is Upon Us...

1316 EDT...

Tuesday, 6/21/2011, 8:30 AM EDT

Severe Thunderstorms are a danger throughout the Mid-Section and into the Appalachians. Pockets of excessive heat can be from out West, in the South, and Southeast. The Northeast and the Pacific Northwest look to be fairly calm today.

For more...see STORMCAST






Darn Near Every Color of The Rainbow...
...check the Advisory Map to the Left...


Monday, 6/20/2011, 10:20 AM EDT


As an Upper Level Low tracks eastward into the Plains, Severe Weather will occur in that area and portions of the Mississippi Valley. Ample Gulf Moisture will feed rainfall and storms throughout the Southeast and Ohio Valley. Fair weather will be found in the West, while flooding could occur in the East. The Wallow Fire continues to burn, along with at least 30 new fires in Texas. Air Quality Alerts remain issued in New Mexico and North Carolina, both due to smoke.

There were 11 reported tornadoes yesterday across the center of the country. There are Heat Advisories in six States today.

Six to 10 inches of snow are expected in the higher elevations of the Rockies.

For more...see STORMCAST





This Says It All...

Happy Father's Day!

Sunday, 6/19/2011, 10:20 AM EDT


For more...see STORMCAST







"...and So It Goes...
"
Kurt Vonnegut. Jr. Slaughterhouse-Five 1969


Saturday, 6/18/2011, 11:00 AM EDT


One more time: Fire and Storms and Heat-

A Strong Ridge moving across the Mid-West will combine with ample Gulf moisture to bring locally heavy rain and thunderstorms to areas from the lee of the Rockies though the Ohio Valley to the Southeast this weekend. A lingering Low could produce scattered rain and storms to the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. The Mountain West will see precipitation, with some high-elevation snow showers. The South and Southern West will experience triple-digit heat for the next few days.

The two main Arizona Wildfires are 38% (Wallow) and 65% (Horseshoe Two) contained, respectively. Air Quality Alerts are still posted in New Mexico (smoke), as well as North Carolina (particulates).


For more...see STORMCAST



A Day of Storms...a Day of Fire
...
...so, What's New?


Friday, 6/17/2011, 8:50 AM EDT


Two strong Lows, one over the Northeast and one in the West will bring rain to New England, and perhaps Severe Thunderstorms across the Plains and east into the Ohio Valley. Extreme Heat will be found in the drought areas of Texas. Another front will bring thunderstorms into the Mid-Atlantic and then North over the weekend. Much of the country is under Hazardous Weather Outlook postings due to possible severe rainstorms. The Wallow Fire in Arizona has been 29% contained, having consumed almost 490.000 acres.

Air Quality Alerts continue in North Carolina and New Mexico. A collapsed levee in South Dakota has been repaired, but the danger still exists for more erosion.




More Fire...More Rain...



Thursday, 6/16/2011, 9:40 AM EDT


The East Coast will have a frontal system pushed through by an upper level Low over the Great Lakes. This will bring showers and thunderstorms through tomorrow. There is a slight risk that some of these storms will be severe. A strong Low will stall over Montana, and coupled with Gulf Moisture, will lead to strong storms over the Plains.

The Arizona Fires continue to be contained*, but eight Western States have Red Flag Warnings up. Floodwaters, especially in Montana, are receding, but continued snowmelt and local precipitation will cause fluctuations for weeks to come. Yosemite continues to see sections closed because of high water.

There are areas of Poor Air Quality in the West due to the Wildfires, and the East due to pollutants.


*NWS Statement: The Wallow Fire in east-central Arizona is now 20% contained, with additional containment likely tonight. Mandatory evacuation orders continue to slowly be eased. The Horseshoe 2 Fire in far southeast Arizona is now more than 60% contained. The Monument Fire along the International Border in southeast AZ has burned more than 5,000 acres and is 10% contained.


For more...see STORMCAST




Some Fire...Some Rain...



Wednesday, 6/15/2011, 10:00 AM EDT











Gulf Moisture is in place over the Mid-West as an upper level Low enter that region. This is touching off showers and thunderstorms from the Mid-West, through the Mississippi Valley, and into the Southlands. Flash Flood Warnings have already been posted in some areas already this morning. Another Low will bring precipitation from the Pacific Northwest into the Rockies.

Here is a NWS quote regarding the Arizona Fires: The Wallow Fire in east-central Arizona has impacted over 440,000 acres of mainly National Forest land since it started on May 29. The fire has now burned into New Mexico. More than 400 firefighters and support staff are battling this fire, with 10% containment thus far. The Horseshoe 2 Fire in far southeast Arizona has burned nearly 150,000 acres since it began on May 8. Containment of the fire is nearing 50% and full containment is expected by June 22. There

Snow melt is causing Flood Conditions in the West, causing some closures in Yosemite. There are Excessive Heat Warnings for Texas, and Air Quality Alerts in sevens States.



For more...see STORMCAST



Flooding, both Coastal and Flash, is the concern today...




Tuesday, 6/14/2011, 9:20 AM EDT


The upper level low system will finally exit the New England area, leaving behind cooler temperatures, and some lingering rain in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. A pair of Lows over the Plains will draw in Gulf Moisture, setting off thunderstorms. Some in the Missouri, Mississippi, and Tennessee Valleys may be severe. An additional trough will move into the region later bringing more precipitation chances. Flooding in the Mountain West has washed out hundreds of roads and bridges, causing damage that may take months to repair. Some rivers and streams will remain at flood stage almost until July

The Arizona Wallow Fire is 10% contained, and the Horseshoe 2 Fire is 50% contained.

For more...see STORMCAST







The East Survived The Beast, the West Gets a (little) Rest, the Middle May Be In A Fiddle...from the Possible Storms...


Monday, 6/13/2011, 9:20 AM EDT


A series of Low Pressures areas in the center of the country will bring Gulf moisture as far north as the Dakotas bringing showers and possible Severe Thunderstorms to the region. Another system will cause precipitation from the Pacific Northwest to the High Plains. Rivers in the North are topping out and beginning to recede after surpassing 1997 levels, the records until this time.

Firefighters in Arizona are beginning to get some control over the major fires there, while five other Western States and Florida have Red Flags posted.

The storms of last night ushered in a Cold Front to much of the East, bringing relief from the oppressive heat and humidity for a few days.



For more...see STORMCAST


Fires, Floods, and Fronts Today...


Sunday, 6/12/2011, 10:00 AM EDT


The Wallow Fire in Arizona is up to 430,000 acres destroyed, and is now spreading into New Mexico. The other main conflagration, Horseshoe Two has burned over 140,000 acres. Red Flags are up in Six Western States. Flooding remains a problem in a number of areas in our country. (Floods)

An East Coast front will move offshore today leaving behind showers and thunderstorms. A series of Lows in the West will draw Gulf Moisture as far North as The Dakotas, setting off storms across the Plains and Mississippi Valley. Another system coming across the Rockies will produce storms across the High Plains.

For more...see STORMCAST





A Nation with Fire, and Rain, and Floods, and Storms...


Saturday, 6/11/2011, 10:50 AM EDT


Fire crews in Arizona are now getting some containment to the Wallow Fire while the total area destroyed now measured at over a half a million acres.

The Mid-West trough will slide eastward bringing a Low into New England by tomorrow. A moist, southerly flow will be in place for the arrival of this front, causing heavy rainfall and possible severe thunderstorms in the East. Another system in the Plains will allow Gulf moisture in to produce showers and thunderstorms to the mid-section of our country this afternoon. A third system from the PNW will bring precipitation to the Northern Rockies.

Additional rain in the North will compound the flooding dangers there, and downstream. Air Quality Alerts may come down with the advent of storms in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast.

For more...see STORMCAST



Right Now, Maybe Not So Many Storms This Day??


Friday, 6/10/2011, 5:00 PM EDT

Storm Prediction Center Experimental Thunderstorm Outlook


Cooler air will remain in the Mid-West due to an upper level trough moving through the Plains States. A Low associated with this will bring heavy rain to the Great Lakes, perhaps touching off Flash Floods in Iowa and Illinois. Severe Thunderstorms could affect areas as far west as Oklahoma. Flooding continues in Montana, with uncounted roads and bridges closed….or gone. The two main Arizona Wildfires have burned over 450,000 acres with the Wallow Fire burning un-checked despite the efforts of over 3,000 firefighters. Air Quality Alerts are posted in the West due to these fires, and in the East and South due to Low-Level Pollution.


For more...see STORMCAST


Another Dangerous Day...

Fire, Floods, Storms, Heat, and Bad Air...

Thursday, 6/9/2011, 10 AM EDT

A front that extends across most of the country will bring showers and thunderstorms to the Northeast tonight, and the Mid-Atlantic tomorrow. As this front moves southward, it will touch off precipitation in the Rockies and onward into the Great Plains. Montana will continue to experience flooding as the area received heavy rain earlier this week. A band of severe weather is possible today from the Plains States to the Northeast. Parts of the Mid-West are either under Flash Flood Warnings, or may be soon.

The Arizona wildfires continue to burn, and have destroyed over 500,000 acres.

Heat warnings are posted for the Mid-Atlantic and Lower NE regions, with numerous schools closing early, and cooling shelters being opened in the urban areas. High levels of ground ozone are the cause of numerous Air Quality Alerts throughout the East.


more...see STORMCAST

It's Not The Heat...

...It's The Heat, Humidity, Air Quality, Floods, Thunderstorms, Wildfires...

(Springtime in The USA)


Wednesday, 6/8/2001 9:25 AM EDT


90 and 100-degree temperatures are on tap for the South and Mid-Atlantic today as well as far North as Minnesota. A slight risk of severe thunderstorms exists for the Great Lakes/Plains regions as well as the Northeast. The Wallow Wildfire in Arizona still burns with 0% containment due to conditions and its remoteness. Flooding is hitting the North and Pacific Northwest very hard. Amtrak service is being suspended from Chicago to Denver due to flooding in the Missouri basin.


more...see STORMCAST